How to Revoke a Durable Power of Attorney

How to Revoke a Durable Power of AttorneyThe durable power of attorney is one of the most useful and important documents in planning your estate. As such, it is important that you execute the instrument wisely, considering what circumstances you would want the powers to be invoked and who your agent should be. At times it becomes necessary to revoke a DPOA, however. A Conroe estate planning attorney can help you through this procedure, but the following provides an overview of the process.

Understanding the Use of a Durable Power of Attorney

The DPOA is an instrument which names an agent, or attorney-in-fact, to make decisions on your behalf in certain situations, usually when you become incapacitated. The term “attorney-in-fact” can be misleading, for the agent does not have to be a lawyer. Rather, the agent should be someone you know well and can trust implicitly to render appropriate decisions on your behalf.

When the DPOA becomes effective the agent is given powers as designated by the instructions. Often this means the power to make decisions about your care and access to your bank accounts. The DPOA stays in effect until either you die or revoke it. Sometimes the instructions name a time at which the instrument will become void as well.

Revoking the DPOA

A situation may arise where you need to revoke the durable power of attorney. Generally this occurs when the named agent falls out of favor for some reason. Perhaps he has acted dishonorably, or has become estranged, such as a son-in-law who divorces your daughter.

The Texas Probate Code, § 488 establishes the right to revoke the DPOA. However, it does not specify precisely how this is to be done. How you should proceed depends on whether the instrument has been filed with the court. If it has not been, and the agent does not have a copy, simply destroying the document should suffice.

More often, however, the DPOA has been filed with the court, and copies given to the agent as well as relevant financial institutions. Your Conroe estate planning attorney will need to file a revocation with the court, and inform your financial institutions in writing that the DPOA is no longer in effect. You also need to request the agent to return his/her copy. The revocation document, itself, needs to include the following:

  • A statement that you are of sound mind and are revoking the DPOA
  • Indication that the agent no longer has durable powers of attorney
  • A copy of the original DPOA
  • The date that the DPOA was executed

For Assistance with Revoking or Setting up a DPOA

If you would like to create a durable power of attorney, or need to revoke and existing one, work with a Conroe estate planning attorney that has dedicated a portion of its practice to estates, wills, and probate. Call Peterson Law Group today at 936-337-4681.

About Chris Peterson

Chris Peterson is an attorney and the owner and founder of Peterson Law Group, a Texas law firm with offices in Bryan/College Station and Kingwood. He mainly practices in the areas of Estate Planning and Business Planning. Chris is also a Certified Estate Planner. Besides his law practice, Chris is a serial entrepreneur and community volunteer. He is known for his cutting edge law practice that utilizes technology to deliver efficient, excellent work.